Danish Way of Life

Danish Way of Life

In the second half of the 20th century Denmark was a country in a state of constant development. Prosperity was growing, consumer patterns changed, and with full employment women began to enter the labour market. 'Danish Design' became a brand, Danish industry grew, creating a need for 'guest-workers' in order to keep the wheels of society in motion.

Danish Design at Struer Museum

With growing prosperity, the Danish welfare state was expanded, and public institutions became influenced by concepts, such as broad-mindedness and equal rights, that led to the youth rebellion. It was a time of experimentation with the Danes organizing themselves in new ways within families, at work, in political movements, in trade unions, and in institutions including schools, kindergartens, and prisons. The influence of media increased, young people became a distinct target group, and the role of leisure time became increasingly important.

Cities and towns grew, and Denmark saw the arrival of single-family home areas complete with middle-class aspirations of home and car ownership. And debates were focused on equal rights, free abortion, and fathers' rights. However, there were also casualties in the wake of the new concepts; the number of inmates in Danish prisons rose during these years. It was a time full of conflict, but also a time which set the agenda for what Danish society has become today.

Europe's largest prison museum Fængslet

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Cultural Paths in Central Jutland, Denmark

Cultural Paths in Central Jutland, Denmark

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Danish Way of Life

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Den Gamle By's town district of 1974

Den Gamle By's town district of 1974

Get close up to the history of modern Denmark in the Den Gamle By's town district of 1974.